Bold Your Headings

Apparently this is not widely known, but you should always bold the headings in your tables.

Then when you use Format as Table (Ctrl + t) on the Home ribbon tab the header row will be correctly identified.

This also applies to the Ctrl + Shift + L shortcut to insert the filter drop downs.

It also applies to the ranges used for charts.

In general ALWAYS BOLD your headings – it is something Excel looks for.

Ctrl + b is the bold shortcut.

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Waterfall charts

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I prefer to call them Bridge charts rather than Waterfall charts, but Waterfall is the common name.

Excel added Waterfalls in Excel 2016.

I think the name Bridge is more descriptive since a bridge takes you from one place to another which is what the chart does with values.

Waterfalls in nature only fall down, whilst a waterfall chart has measures that rise and fall.

This blog post show many examples. Most examples are not done in Excel.

Link to blog post.

 

Gannt Charts in Excel

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Comparing Measures

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If you are ever tempted to start a column (bar) chart at a point other than zero, please read this post.

It also has suggestions for alternative chart types to handle comparisons.

Filtering Tip

Make your headings bold.

This tip applies to tables and to the structures you use for charts.

Excel looks for the bold format when it reviews tables and layouts to figure out if your table has a headings row.

You can use Ctrl + Shift + L to add or remove the filter icons to a data table. There is also an icon on Data ribbon tab.

This will work more reliably if the headings are bold.

I use the following keyboard combination on the top left corner of the table.

Ctrl + Shift + right arrow (this selects all the headings)

Ctrl + b (this applies bold to the headings)

Ctrl + Shift + L (to turn on filters)

This combination can be done very quickly.

You can just use Ctrl + Shift + L within the table, but sometimes this applies the filter to the wrong row.