Open Filter the Drop Down

If you have filters turned on and you are in the heading row of the table you can press Alt + down arrow to open the filter drop down.

You can then use the arrow keys to move up and down.

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Distinct Count in Excel

The Data Model to the rescue

Counting is the poor cousin to summing in Excel. Not many people count things, but everyone adds up things. There is a special sort of count that can be useful. A distinct count counts unique entries and is hard to do with a formula. If you have Excel 2013 or a later version you can use a PivotTable to perform a distinct count.

Bold Your Headings

Apparently this is not widely known, but you should always bold the headings in your tables.

Then when you use Format as Table (Ctrl + t) on the Home ribbon tab the header row will be correctly identified.

This also applies to the Ctrl + Shift + L shortcut to insert the filter drop downs.

It also applies to the ranges used for charts.

In general ALWAYS BOLD your headings – it is something Excel looks for.

Ctrl + b is the bold shortcut.

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Free Excel Webinar Recording – What If Techniques

Feedback score 92%

My free Excel webinar for September 2018 covered What If Techniques. Download the materials using the button below and watch the video.

Download Webinar Materials

Content applies to Excel 2010 and later versions. You will need to install the Solver Add-in – instructions in the manual and  video.

  • Goal Seek – simple what-if changes
  • Solver – advanced what-if analysis
  • Scenario Manager – handling different sets of inputs
  • Data Tables – single and double variable sensitivity analysis
  • NEW – Forecast sheet

Inserting a Blank Row Between Entries

Manual technique

Over the years I have had many requests to help people insert blank rows between entries is a list. Apparently it is for an input routine that requires blanks. My normal solution is a macro because it automates the process, but there is a manual technique that is quick and easy.

Easy Financial Year Formula

To get the Australian financial year from a date you usually use an IF function based on the month number.

I recently learned a new hack from Matt Allington of Exceleratorbi.

You can add 184 to the date and then use the YEAR function. See table and formulas below.

The formula in cell B2 is

=YEAR(A2)

The formula in cell C2 is

=YEAR(A2+184)

Both formulas have been copied down.

A simple solution to a frustrating issue. Thanks Matt.