Inserting Data into Formatted Tables

I was recently working with a large Formatted Table in excess of 100,000 rows with Power Query.

I was copying in new data to a temporary workings table and then manipulating it with Power Query to get the required output. The data was varying lengths. I found that if you pasted data into a Formatted Table that was a lot longer than the Formatted Table it can take a long time for Excel to process the paste (I am talking tens of thousands of extra rows).

To get around this delay I found that if you first expanded the Formatted Table using Insert Rows, the paste was virtually instantaneous. Inserting the extra rows was also very quick.

So if your Table has sufficient rows the paste is quick, if Excel needs to expand the table to fit the new data, it can be slow for large data sets. Make sure you insert sufficient blank rows to speed up the paste.

You can learn more about Formatted Tables at the two blog posts below. I have also covered the topic in numerous free webinars.

Format As Table in Excel Part 1

Excel Format as Table Part 2 [VIDEO]

Sheet Protection – No password

When you protect a sheet with a password, you must make a note of the password, otherwise you create problems for yourself.

Did you know you don’t have to supply a password?

To apply sheet protection, right click the sheet tab and choose Protect Sheet.

When the Protect Sheet dialog displays just press Enter or click OK.

This protects the sheet with no password.

This stops accidental changes and you can easily unprotect the sheet to make changes.

You can right click the sheet tab to unprotect as well.

Relationships Shortcut

Excel 2013 added the Data Model to Excel.

The Relationships option (Data ribbon) is part of that model. It allows you to create relationships between tables so that you can use a PivotTable to report on multiple tables.

See my December 2016 INTHEBLACK article for an example.

The keyboard shortcut to create or edit, a Relationship is easy to remember – it is

Alt a a

Pressed in sequence, not held down.

Pasting Charts in Word and PowerPoint

When you paste Excel charts into Word or PowerPoint you may also be pasting all the underlying data that created the chart.

To get around that problem, you can use the Copy as Picture option.

This option is on a drop down on the Copy button on the Home ribbon – see image below.

copy_chart_1

You have a few options to choose from on what and how to copy.

copy_chart_2

This treats the chart as a graphic, which breaks any links to the underlying data. It also makes it much easier to re-size the chart when you paste it in the destination document.

It is not dynamic at all – it is a point in time capture.

Format part of a text string

Many people don’t know that you can format part of a text string in a cell.

This can be useful if you want to highlight, or emphasis, a particular word or phrase in a text string.

You can double click a word in the Formula Bar or while editing in a cell and a small menu pops up – see image below.

test

The options are reasonably limited, but you can use Bold or Italic, change the font; the font size and font colour – see examples below.

text-format

Show or Hide Cell Comments

Cell comments (they are like a sticky notes for cells) are great for instructions and documentation.

To show all the comments press, in sequence, not held down

Alt r  a

This is a toggle, so you can use the same sequence to hide all the comments.

alt-r-a

Reapply a Filter

Let’s say you have applied a filter to a list.

The list is dynamic and the values have been updated by a refresh – the filter is out of date.

You don’t have to go into the filter drop down to re-apply the filter.

You can use a keyboard shortcut whilst in any cell in the table.

Ctrl + Alt + L

 

reapply